ThePostGame.com links Ray Lewis to banned substance

Ray Lewis has been linked to a banned substance in an article on ThePostGame.com about Raiders head coach Hue Jackson’s affiliation with a supplement company.

The article discusses that the NFL ordered Jackson to end his affiliation with Sports With Alternative To Steroids (S.W.A.T.S.) because they offer a product that contains IGF-1, a substance that is banned by the National Football League.

How is Ray Lewis mixed into all of this? Stay with me here. According to the writer, S.W.A.T.S. owner Mitch Ross said that he supplied Jackson with free products that he distributed to players at the NFL Combine in 2008, including Ray lewis.

“In April of ’08 I gave various alternatives to steroids, including spray, to Hue Jackson at the Ravens’ training camp,” Ross said. “I also gave the spray to Jay Hayes of the Bengals and Anthony Lynn of the Jets. I want to prove that my protocol reverses the aging process on aging athletes and promotes the healing of injuries in a legal manner.”

The spray mentioned in the quote above, is called “The Ultimate Spray,” and was used by Rams linebacker David Vobora when he failed a drug test in 2009. Vobora is currently suing S.W.A.T.S. because he believes the spray was contaminated with a steroid.

Ross (S.W.A.T.S. owner) provided half a dozen text messages exchanged between him and Ray Lewis over the past two years in which the Ravens linebacker acknowledged receiving the spray. Ross estimated that he sent 25 bottles of spray to Lewis over the past two seasons.

Bengals safety Roy Williams was also a user of “The Ultimate Spray.” While Lewis was unreachable, according to the writer, Williams was more than able to talk about it.

Asked about IGF-1 being listed on the S.W.A.T.S. site, Williams said, “I didn’t know it was on there. I’ve never failed a drug test. I don’t want to be associated with something that is banned. Kids look up to me.”

As ThePostGame.com points out, neither Ray Lewis or Roy Williams have ever been sanctioned for failing an NFL drug test.

While this article is may be creating a story out of nothing, it is clear that according to S.W.A.T.S. owner Mitch Ross, Ray Lewis does indeed use “The Ultimate Spray,” which contains IGF-1. The question is whether Ross is telling the truth or whether Lewis even uses the substance. Since he has never failed a drug test, odds are that this story is false.

But how much can NFL drug tests be trusted? There are far too many questions to be answered before any assumptions are made.

Zach Wilt is the Founding Editor of BaltimoreSportsReport.com and host of the BSR Podcast. He's a loyal Orioles, Ravens and Capitals fan who is obsessed with baseball, loves traveling, In-N-Out Burger and Walt Disney World.

9 Comments

  1. Dave

    January 20, 2011 at 12:30 pm

    Lewis and Williams both received the product. Williams further admits to using the product. Many bottles were sent to Lewis… so, if neither have failed the test (and Williams admits to using it) does the product actually have the banned substance in it? How many others have the cajones to step forward and admit to using it, AND haven't failed the test either?

  2. Billie Jo

    January 20, 2011 at 1:41 pm

    What I don’t understand is how a story like this could deserve our attention? It is clear that this is just another one of those stupid “conspiracy” stories. . “If” they sprayed that stuff on their bodies, why care, the evidence shows that neither failed a drug test. Ray Lewis is one of the “GREAT’ players who deserves our respect, not rumors. I am a “DIE HARD STEELERS FAN”, but I love all sports, and am able to appreciate a good player. No matter what team they are on. So let’s give these men the benefit of the doubt and STOP spreading idiotic innuendos.

  3. @taigashep

    January 20, 2011 at 1:42 pm

    What I don't understand is how a story like this could deserve our attention? It is clear that this is just another one of those stupid "conspiracy" stories. . "If" they sprayed that stuff on their bodies, why care, the evidence shows that neither failed a drug test. Ray Lewis is one of the "GREAT' players who deserves our respect, not rumors. I am a "DIE HARD STEELERS FAN", but I love all sports, and am able to appreciate a good player. No matter what team they are on. So let’s give these men the benefit of the doubt and STOP spreading idiotic innuendos.

  4. salbooskie

    January 20, 2011 at 1:46 pm

    where can I get some spray? I wanna look young forever!!!

  5. @2131andBeyond

    January 20, 2011 at 2:19 pm

    Bahahaha.

    • Zach

      January 20, 2011 at 2:28 pm

      Better be careful Avi. Matt and I have run off quite of Steelers fans this week.

      • @2131andBeyond

        January 20, 2011 at 2:57 pm

        Uh oh.

        Am I being booted?

        I just think this kind of story is comical. Would help explain how he played so many damn snaps in 2010 :)

        • Zach

          January 20, 2011 at 3:00 pm

          Not getting booted. No one wants to hear the Steelers talk though.

  6. Chuck

    January 20, 2011 at 5:03 pm

    IGF-1 is not effective when used via nasal spray. It is only effective when injected. When taken orally is is “wasted” by our body and never used. These products are scams and will certainly not cause a failed drug test. I didn’t see anywhere here that Ray Lewis “used” this substance anyway. Only that he received free samples. This article is a bunch of smoke and mirrors!